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  • E-Resources
    Anatomy.tv is here! Posted Friday, December 20, 2013, 11:09 am
    Anatomytv

    Anatomy.tv is now available as a library subscription.

    Anatomy.tv is an internet-based solution that is an evidence-based interactive online learning tool used for patient, practitioner and student education.  Derived from real human data,  Anatomy.tv provides over 5,000 3D anatomical structures, clinical slides, dissections, animations and much more.

    Key Features:
    • 3D modeling of all structures
    • Ability to rotate the model 360 degrees and add or remove layers of anatomy
    • Link to relevant text, dissections, clinical slides, diagrams, video clips & MRI Scans
    • Quiz and MCQs
    • Patient information for the practicing clinician

    If you are having problems with Anatomy.tv, this information might help.
    • You must accept STATRef Terms and Conditions to use Anatomy.tv
    • Five access licenses are shared among five institutions.  Once the maximum number of users is reached, any additional access attempts will fail and you'll need to try again later.
    • Pop-ups must be enabled for the site.  Information about configuring your browser(s) to allow pop-ups for Anatomy.tv is available at http://www.anatomy.tv/faqs.aspx.
    • For iPad users, it requires the download of the Puffin App ($2.99). For all other users (Mac, PC, Windows, Android, etc.), no download required.

  • Library
    Library Exhibit Posted Friday, November 1, 2013, 3:55 pm
    Exhibit "Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine"

    Many histories have been written about medical care during the American Civil War, but the participation and contributions of African Americans as nurses, surgeons, and hospital workers have often been overlooked. Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine looks at the men and women who served as surgeons and nurses and how their service as medical providers challenged the prescribed notions of race and gender pushing the boundaries of the role of African Americans in America.

    The History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine is pleased to provide you with this exceptional traveling exhibition, which will be on display in the Harley E. French Library of the Health Sciences from November 5 to December 14.
  • E-Resources
    Anatomy.tv: a trial Posted Friday, October 18, 2013, 11:15 am
    Anatomytv

    Anatomy.tv is available as a trial until October 31st.  

    STAT!Ref's Primal Pictures resources are complete, detailed and accurate 3D models of the human anatomy. Anatomy.tv is an internet-based solution that is an evidence-based interactive online learning tool used for patient, practitioner and student education.  Derived from real human data, Anatomy.tv provides over 5,000 3D anatomical structures, clinical slides, dissections, animations and much more.
    Key Features:
    • 3D modeling of all structures
    • Ability to rotate the model 360 degrees and add or remove layers of anatomy
    • Link to relevant text, dissections, clinical slides, diagrams, video clips & MRI Scans
    • Quiz and MCQs
    • Patient information for the practicing clinician
    • For iPad users, it requires the download of the Puffin App ($2.99). For all other users (Mac, PC, Windows, Android, etc.), no download required.


    Please check it out and send us your comments.

  • E-Resources
    PubMed and Internet Explorer 7 Posted Friday, February 22, 2013, 9:14 am
    While searching PubMed using Internet Explorer 7 as your browser, you may have noticed a warning saying, "You are currently running Internet Explorer 7. NCBI will stop supporting this browser on 1 January 2013." This only impacts Internet Explorer 7; newer versions of Internet Explorer will function properly.

    While PubMed will continue to function as you use Internet Explorer 7, over time you will notice Internet Explorer 7 will have difficulty rendering pages correctly. It may be weeks or months before this happens. The best solutions are to upgrade to Internet Explorer 10 or to choose a different browser when using PubMed.

    For full details on this decision, and information about supported web browsers, please visit this webpage: http://ncbiinsights.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/2013/02/05/what-does-ncbis-internet-explorer-7-warning-mean/
  • E-Resources
    NLM PubReader Unveiled! Posted Tuesday, January 15, 2013, 4:40 pm
    The National Library of Medicine has developed a new, more user-friendly interface for reading journal articles in the PubMed Central archive [PMC]. The PubReader view of articles is optimized for small-screen devices such as tablets or smart phones. Navigate through the article by swiping or tapping the pages. Open figures from anywhere in the article without losing your place. Tap in-text citations to view the record in PubMed or to read the full works cited list. Don't use a tablet or other small-screen device? Don't worry! PubReader is fully functional on your home or work computer with the major web browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari.
    Feel free to contact your local medical librarian for more information about PubReader: Sandi L. Bates or Dawn Hackman in Grand Forks, Mary Markland in Fargo, Marcia Francis in Bismarck, and Karen Anderson in Minot. You can also read the original announcement on the PMC website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/about/pubreader/.
  • Training
    Access Medicine: Take a Tour Posted Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 3:39 pm
    Take a quick site tour of Access Medicine that highlights the interactive features of the website.
  • Training
    PubMed: Update Your Skills Posted Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 3:17 pm
    There are many ways to update your PubMed Skills.   If you have a block of dedicated time, give the PubMed Tutorial a try. If you only have a few minutes, and would like a brief tutorial on a specific PubMed topic, you might like to try a PubMed Quick Tour. And of course, if you have questions or would like to have some one-on-one assistance, please contact one of our librarians.
  • Other
    Banned Book Week Observed Posted Tuesday, October 2, 2012, 1:28 pm
    Banned Book Week is Sept. 30 to Oct. 6. In observance the North Dakota Library Association's Intellectual Freedom Committee created a 2:30 "read out" video featuring banned books. View North Dakota's video for the 50 State Salute to Banned Book Week at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxMWYe5S8YI
  • E-Resources
    Looking for ICD-9 or ICD-10 Codes Posted Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 12:24 pm
    There are several ways to find these codes in the library resources.  Give DynaMed a try.  Go to DynaMed in the Selected Resources section of the library web site  Then search for the disease or condition.  When you go to the specific screen for that disease or condition you will find a link for ICD-9 / ICD-10 codes.

    If you have questions about finding Codes or searching DynaMed, please contact one of our librarians.
  • Other
    Docs' Sensitivity & Good Outcomes Posted Monday, September 17, 2012, 10:47 am
    Results of a study that measures doctors level of empathy with patients indicates lower rates of serious complications.  To read the news release on the MedlinePlus site see Docs' Sensitivity to Patients' Feelings Tied to Good Outcomes .  

    The article abstract from PubMed follows:
    PURPOSE:
    To test the hypothesis that scores of a validated measure of physician empathy are associated with clinical outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus.
    METHOD:
    This retrospective correlational study included 20,961 patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus from a population of 284,298 adult patients in the Local Health Authority, Parma, Italy, enrolled with one of 242 primary care physicians for the entire year of 2009. Participating physicians' Jefferson Scale of Empathy scores were compared with occurrence of acute metabolic complications (hyperosmolar state, diabetic ketoacidosis, coma) in diabetes patients hospitalized in 2009.
    RESULTS:
    Patients of physicians with high empathy scores, compared with patients of physicians with moderate and low empathy scores, had a significantly lower rate of acute metabolic complications (4.0, 7.1, and 6.5 per 1,000 patients, respectively, P < .05). Logistic regression analysis showed physicians' empathy scores were associated with acute metabolic complications: odds ratio (OR) = 0.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.95, contrasting physicians with high and low empathy scores). Patients' age also contributed to the prediction of acute metabolic complications: OR = 1.7 (95% CI, 1.2-1.4). Physicians' gender and age, patients' gender, type of practice (solo, association), geographical location of practice (mountain, hills, plain), and length of time the patient had been enrolled with the physician were not associated with acute metabolic complications.
    CONCLUSIONS:
    These results suggest that physician empathy is significantly associated with clinical outcome for patients with diabetes mellitus and should be considered an important component of clinical competence.     PMID: 22836852

    The full article is available by going to Sept. 2012 issue of  Academic Medicine (Vol 87, No 9, pg 1243 - 1249.
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